Wednesday, 27 June 2012

Welcome to the Lizzie Lenard Vintage Sewing Blog



...which will be all about vintage sewing machines and putting them to good use.







The Muvandfarve channel started out on Youtube with this video showing how to wind a bobbin and load the shuttle on a long bobbin machine.  The bobbin winders are fascinating.  When I was little my mum let me turn the handle for bobbin winding.  The machine on this video was her machine, and the machine I learnt to sew on.  It was manufactured in 1897, so it is already 115 years years old and still going strong.  There is no reason why it shouldn't last another 115 years, and it is my sincere hope that there will still be plenty of people who know how to use these wonderful machines.

In fact, I'm on a mission...

PS.  The Muvandfarve channel has now been renamed the Lizzie Lenard Channel.  Farve is still indispensable when it comes to lighting, camera and editing, and he was totally unbothered at the suggestion that the channel should be renamed.

53 comments:

  1. Dear Lizzie,

    Thanks for the message you sent me about this blog. I could see it spawning into something very informational, educational and interesting.

    Here is a link to the sewing-machines section of my own blog, which you may be interested in:

    http://scheong.wordpress.com/category/household-history/vintage-singer-sewing-machines/

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  2. Hello Sheong,

    Nice to hear from you! Thank you for the link to your blog - I will be looking in soon...

    Best regards Muv aka Lizzie

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  3. Hello Muv, I purchased my first antique hand crank sewing machine in June. I am a very keen and fairly experienced dressmaker but have always used a modern Singer machine. I have just completed cleaning and oiling my new price and joy a Singer 28k. I couldn't have attempted this without the assistance of your amazing videos on You Tube. I was able to follow every step and the machine looks beautiful. I also used your tension adjustment video to get the tension adjustment correct. I had such fun with this project so I have just purchased a little Vesta which also needs cleaning. Thank you so much for sharing your knowledge and experience.

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  4. Hello Anonymous,

    Delighted to hear from you!

    Best of luck with the Vesta. The cog teeth on the wheel on my Little Vesta were a bit of a job to clean. Interdental toothbrushes came in handy. If you have an older model Vesta you might have trouble with the needles - they took a shorter needle, which might be difficult to get hold of. Mine is a later model and takes a standard needle.

    Let me know how you get on!

    Muv

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  5. Hello,

    I'm reading your blog in Ireland and I just want to say thanks a million for your videos and posts. After reading about Singers it turns out we have two at home a vibrating shuttle machine and a 201K, both handcranks.

    I' love to read more about the shuttle machines as I haven't a clue what our one is as there is no information or manual with it. Its quite like the 28K in your video except that the bobbin winder is higher up on the machine and it has Egyptian themed decals.

    Thanks to your video I was finally able to set the bobbin correctly and sort out a bit about the top tension (although its not 100% yet).

    I'd love to know more about setting the stitch length with the thumbscrew as well as adjusting the presser foot.

    Best from Ireland,

    Micheál

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  6. Hello Micheal,
    Great to hear from you! You lucky man, having two sewing machines hiding in the house. The 201K is a highly rated model.
    Your sphinx machine could be a 28K, 27K or 127K. Later 28Ks were made with the bobbin winders set at the top.
    Using the stitch length knob is a question of trial and error - just find the stitch length you like and stick to it for a while, then vary it from there.
    I'll do a post about adjusting the pressure on the presser foot in the next few days.
    Love,
    Muv

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    Replies
    1. Hello Muv,

      Thanks a million for getting back to me. I got a bit over-enthusiastic with taking the machine apart and starting unscrewing the presser foot. A few questions on the stitch-length regulator for you:

      Does the presser foot need to be down when you set the stitch-length knob?

      While changing the stitch length I noticed that as it got finer I started to get loose loops in the stitches, when setting the stitch length does the top tension need to be reset as well?

      Also on the Sphinx machine the wooden handle has come away completely, any suggestions on what to do for a replacement?

      Theres a bit of play on the crank wheel as well, so that when turning the handle it makes a bit of a rattle also on part of the rotation the motion gets a bit stiff.

      I've taken it apart and cleaned and oiled it and there was no washer on the big screw that holds the handle in.

      Sorry, I know thats a lot but any tips when you can would be greatly appreciated. Despite all my messing about I can't sew at all, but I suppose I need to have the machine in good order first before I learn. Sadly all the classes here are dress-making and as I'm a fella, a dress for me would be a bit fashion-forward!

      Thanks a million again,

      Micheál

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  7. Hello Micheal,

    The presser foot should be up at all times except when you are actually sewing. In this way you will never have metal moving on metal, so you won't wear down your feed dog teeth.

    Altering the stitch length makes no difference to the tension. If the tension is right you will not get loops, whatever the stitch length. What you have found is that the shorter the stitch length, the more noticeable faulty tension becomes.

    We've got a handle that needs fixing. I've been a complete girl on that one so far and have been nagging my husband. I'll do a blog post once we've fixed it.

    Have you taken off the balance wheel and cleaned the stop motion screw? Have a look at the vssmb.blogspot.co.uk and you'll see what I'm on about.

    Also, have a look at the comments left by Duncan Hill under the post for 26th September, cleaning the bobbin winder. He is doing nuts and bolts type videos which you might find helpful. I'm sure he would be delighted if you contacted him.

    Perhaps I need to do a series of posts called Sewing for Blokes. I can think of at least four people who might follow it.

    You will be interested to hear why this blog is called Lizzie Lenard Vintage Sewing. Most of my forebears came to this country from Ireland at the time of the Great Famine. Elizabeth Lenard was my great-great-grandmother from Roscommon. Her father John Lenard was a tailor, and several of her daughters and grand-daughters were tailoresses.

    So there you have it. It's in the blood.

    But I'm not Irish enough to call myself Bonaparte. You rebel.

    Love,
    Muv


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  8. Muv, a chara, (friend in Irish)

    Weavers, tailors and cats, three little divils that never got fat.

    Go away out of that! I went to school with a fella by the name of Leonard, its uncommon as a second name so you could be related some way.

    For the presser foot and the tensioning, the reason I did that is as in the 201K handbook it says tot regulate the thread tension while the foot is down. But I didn't sew/engage the mechanism with it like that.

    Bloke or no bloke I can't for the life of me figure out what to do with the handle. The piece of metal it was on is riveted and actually quite rough so the wooden handle itself must not have been able to turn.

    For the crank wheel I took it off and the stop-motion bit as well, but there's still play in it, and I daren't screw it in further, I may have to get a washer for it.

    I'd love a few posts on sewing for blokes. I've a ton of stupid questions for you if you do!

    I seem to be getting on ok with the machine, but I haven't a notion what to do next.

    Like for instance when I sew over a seam the stitches get very close together and then go back to normal when sewing over plain fabric (at present I'm using an old rag to test stitches etc. on)

    If I want to sew a heavy weight fabric like denim will I have to adjust the bobbin tension again?

    Thanks a million for the links you've put up and your suggestions.

    Micheál

    PS what is Muv short for?

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  9. Hello again Micheal,

    Nice to hear you are having a go at stitching. If your old rag is stretchy you are going to give yourself a bad time. For test stitching use either craft weight cotton (what quilters use) or dress weight poplin. Beg some offcuts or scraps from someone.

    Once the tension is set right, it's right, whatever the stitch length and whatever weight of material you are using. If you need to adjust it, adjust the top thread tension and leave the bobbin tension alone. You only need to adjust the bobbin tension if you can't get it right by adjusting the top thread. The bobbin thread should be a once only adjustment, with all other adjustments after that to the top thread.

    The reason your manual says to adjust the tension with the presser foot down is because when the foot is up the top tension is automatically disengaged.

    There could be any number of reasons the stitch is irregular when you go over a seam - stretchy fabric, slippery synthetic, pulling at the material instead of letting the feed dogs do the work,incorrect pressure on the presser bar...

    Why don't you go to that dressmaking class? It could be the best entertainment you and the ladies there could possibly wish for.

    Love,
    Muv
    short for Muvver
    crikey, fancy not working that out.

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  10. I wrote about my experience in great detail a while ago, then tried to post it but couldn't. I then did successfully write to you, but didn't tell you the whole story, so I would like to, as your helpful tutorial was what decided me on getting a nice slow quiet machine, over a fast newbie. Much more enjoyable I think.
    You are a revolutionary, because as this life gets quicker, more digitised and compressed, you are slowing it down for us!
    I made a quilt top on a frien'ds Brother machine in about half and hour but was so frazzled by the end it wasn't all that much fun! it was so noisy, and so fast. I don't go that fast, so it feels JUST RIGHT to be paired with my beautiful old hand crank.
    May many more be inspired as I was to take up therapy!!

    Felicity

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    1. Felicity,

      Lovely to hear from you!

      I didn't realise I was a revolutionary, more of a reactionary, I thought.

      Thank you for telling me where to find pictures of your machine. It certainly is beautiful.

      Love,
      Muv

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  11. I recently signed up after seeing your Machine oiling videos on You Tube - so informative!

    I am just in the process of restoring an old handcranked 1895 Singer 28 which is in a very poor state - lots of the decals are no longer there, and there is 'gunk' all over the machine parts underneath (I'm wondering if someone used 3 in 1 on it!).

    I inherited it from my mother, though I had sewn on it all the time from the age of about 8 (50 years ago!) until I left home at 18.

    It's only now that I am coming to appreciate how it works and what brilliant machines they are - I am planning to use it to repair a canvas sail cover, in preference to my Elna Diva, which I don't think would handle it.

    I am only now aware of all the different feet that can be used, and the fact that you can do zigzag with the right attachment on a straight stitch machine.

    I have spent much of today cleaning some of the parts, and can get most of the bits off, apart from the needle plate, the back plate on the tension assembly and the machine back plate (I can take the screw out but the plate stays in place, so I have put some WD40 all around the edge in the hope that will loosen it).

    I managed to get a new tension spring and bobbin tyre from Helen Howes website (it's fascinating just looking at the phots of parts on her site!), so I am nearly ready to start sewing!

    I am looking forward to reading all the interesting information on your site - I'm sure it will help me so much with all my questions.

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    1. Hello Anneg,

      It sounds as though you are really enjoying giving your machine an overhaul.

      I have given up before now trying to remove parts like needle plates that won't budge. Sometimes if you heat parts up with a hairdrier it can encourage them to shift. Also Americans swear by stuff called Tri-flow for ungluing parts that are stuck fast, but I haven't been able to find it in this country. You have to be careful with WD40, because that too can gum parts together if you don't clean it off afterwards.

      I hope the machine is up and running again soon!

      Love,
      Muv

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  12. Thanks for your comments Muv.

    I used to sew all the time until about 14 years ago - due to various reasons - now as I approach my 60th I've decided I need to do what I love to do! - Hence the machine revival - I also have an old electric Cresta from the 60's which I am going to get serviced - an all metal machine which is basically a 'bobbin' singer zig zag machine with an elecric motor as far as I can see - ever come across them? They were based at Wolverhampton and I believe went out of business around 1972 ( just managed to get a non - working duplicate from ebay so have spare parts at least!).

    RE the WD 40 - I only plan to use it for freeing up the bits to take off - not for the mechanical parts - I've read that paraffin can remove a lot of the stuff there, then clean and apply the machine oil.

    Just taken some photos and the moving bits look awful - basically brown gunk all over instead of nice and shiny - haven't seen one as bad on the internet yet! Just sent for some Peek! - will try the hairdryer and take a look at the Tri-flow, or similar, for the back plate.

    One question I have - after applying lots and lots of sewing machine oil I can now move the stitch length knob with a great deal of effort.(so will apply more oil) Does it come out at all or is it a captured screw - mine just stops at a certain point - maybe it is attached to something at the other end?

    Thanks for all your help

    Anneg

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  13. Hello Anneg,

    It's frightening to think how many years of accumulated muck you have to contend with inside old sewing machines. This evening I have taken off the stop motion screw of a machine I bought last week. I swear someone put in a big blob of vaseline to grease it in about 1955. It is dark rusty brown and smells exactly how you would expect rusty vaseline to smell.

    Cresta machines were imported, many from East Germany. I have checked on the Needlebar website, and they have pictures of Cresta Autostitch machines. Is that what you have?

    The stitch length adjustment knob doesn't come out. It should stop once you have about three threads of the screw showing, so don't try unscrewing it any more. When it is that far out it will give a really small stitch.

    Love,
    Muv

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  14. Hi Muv

    I've to look at my 28 stop motion screw - it's stuck at the moment - I have only got as far as testing if I can undo the handcrank screw at the moment - and I can, so at least that is something.

    I saw a brilliant explanation or video (can't quite remember which - it must be old age!)about how to remove it and get the washer and set screw (I think it's called) all back in the right place so it works without to much trial and error - must look for it again.

    My Cresta isn't an Autostich - it's a T132 - a T132-3 to be precise. Exactly the same as this one I just bought off ebay and in the same condition - to look at anyway.

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/CRESTA-SEWING-MACHINE-/150992716726?pt=UK_CraftsCollect_SewingMachines_RL&hash=item2327de03b6&nma=true&si=LAWNA%252B0BbxWp1xoEue4v2JolCpo%253D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557

    It's confusing because there are 4 versions, - v3 is supposed to come without a foot controller, and v4 with one - but both the 3's I have, have one.

    In both machines the motor doesn't drive the needle bar so I'm thinking it's either the motor belts, brushes or the clutches are stuck and aren't disengaging from the bobbin winder - which is happily spinning on both of them. They are off to be serviced on Monday together with my Elna Diva (that is sewing perfectly after not even being switched on for 14 years - though I did sit it by the fire for a couple of hours to warm it's oil and circuit boards up before switching it on!)

    I didn't know Cresta came from various places - but it's a solid machine - as heavy, if not heavier than my 28. It was sold mail order and bought for me around my 16th birthday ready for my A-level needlework course in 1969. I think all the feet will fit my 28 except of course that that only has a straight stitch needle plate. I guess I could try the 28 feet on the Cresta once I get it back. (need to get in touch with Helen Howes for some more bits for those).

    Regarding the 28 stich length adjuster - when I tried my first sew with it after all these years when I took the lid off it stitched perfectly, a small stitch with beautiful tension - and it didn't even have a tension spring then!

    However I want the longest stitch it can do for the sail cover - that seems to be around 4 or 5 mm which is about right - hence why I wanted to get it free moving so I could actually screw it all out to clean the thread and then screw it all back in again without it likely to get stuck on this long stitch. This will match the stitching already on the sail cover and that and the 100 (or even 110 needles) with the V69 marine thread should mean that I won't get too many tension problems - fingers crossed.

    I have another question re the 28 - it has 2 spool pins - One on the high point of the arm nearest the wheel, and then another a couple of inches further along towards the needle bar - where the arm starts dipping.

    Is this normal for a 1895 Singer 28? - or has someone put a pin in an oil hole? - not that I can get it out anyway. I guess I could try sewing with 2 threads at once through the single needle which I have read can be done. Maybe one is meant for the bobbing so you don't have to take thread from the already threaded spool?

    I have gone on a bit, but am really quite excited at discovering my hobby again - especially with all the developments, information and websites now available since I last sewed anything!

    Thanks again for sharing all your knowledge!

    Anneg

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  15. Hello Anneg,

    This might be what you were looking for about stop motion screws

    vssmb.blogspot.co.uk

    The old 28Ks have two spool pins so you can wind a bobbin while you are sewing. However it is harder work sewing when the bobbin winder is engaged.

    Best of luck with the sail cover - I hope the 28K is up to it. It might be worth talking to Helen Howes. Have you seen the picture on her website of her sewing a marquee on her treadle?

    Love,
    Muv

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  16. Hi Muv

    Thanks for the link - will take a look. I've now confirmed my machine is a VS3 28-4 which does indeed have the 2 spool pins.

    I'm not convinced it's a K - I thought that meant it was made in Kilbowie(I think it is) in Scotland. Not sure when they started making them there, but the original bobbing tyre was white, which I have read was used in the US. I think you are supposed to be able to tell from the Serial number, but all the info I have found only gives me the date not where - maybe I should get in touch with Singer.

    I'm really in to all the history now, and am fascinated by the feet and how they were developed (the number of times it's been 1 am before I've got to bed these last few weeks because of reading stuff on the web I can't count).

    I did speak to Helen re my machine (when I ordered the tension spring and new tyre) and she said it would cope with the canvas, so when I've at least cleaned it up to a state where I can oil it I am going to give it a try - need to get the cover ready for end of April and so much to do before then!

    Thanks again for the info.

    Anneg

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    Replies
    1. Hello Anneg,

      Singer used to have information on their website showing where the machines were made, but they took it down. Any Singer in this country was in all probability manufactured at Kilbowie.

      It's worth burning the midnight oil - you end up finding out so much.

      Love,
      Muv

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  17. Hello Muv,

    I've recently been gifted my husband's grandmother's singer, it is a 1937 long bobbin machine. I have found your video tutorials very useful in learning how to use this wonderful machine; as it had not been used in many years I have also followed your instructions in cleaning and oiling it (it looks great!)but i have found that since doing this it is not picking up the thread from the bobbin - I know it's probably something I have or haven't done but cannot work out what. If you have any ideas, I would be most greatful

    Thanks
    Carrie

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    Replies
    1. Hello Carrie,

      Congratulations on your new machine! I'm so glad you have found the videos and blog helpful.

      Click on the heading Stitch Formation at the right hand side of this page and you will find the posts of 22nd February and 2nd May this year.

      If you look at these posts you will see how the stitch is formed on a long bobbin machine. Watch the video to make sure you have the needle set the right way, and then try the stitch and watch what is going on underneath. Make sure you have a piece of material under the foot, and check that a loop is being formed by the top thread for the shuttle to pass through.

      Good luck!

      Muv

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  18. Bravo! Thank you for being a force on the WWW. I'll be reading over your blog and I've subscribed to your You Tube Channel.

    Two vintage machines have made their home at my house and I want to know all I can to keep them properly.

    Please visit if you can and offer any suggestions on their care.

    Thanks in advance.

    Cheers,

    Lyric
    http://www.sewandcro.com/minnesota-treadle-machine-one/
    http://www.facebook.com/sewandcro

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    Replies
    1. Hello Lyric,

      Thank you! I hope you enjoy the blog and videos.

      Congratulations on your two vintage machines. Once you have them cleaned and oiled, use them as much as you can. That way you get used to them, and they will run better for the use. And just think of all the wonderful clothes and quilts you will make...

      I've nipped over to your blog and absolutely love your goats.

      Love,
      Muv

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  20. Hi Lizzie, I am the most recent owner of a 1902 Singer 28 bought from a sewing machine 'fixer' in TX, USA this summer. It is in pristine condition and I enjoyed cleaning and oiling this beautiful workhorse step by step with the help of your YouTube videos. After using Peek polish, her chrome now glows. To ensure that her flawless decals are not damaged by use, I polished the rest of the machine after gentle cleaning with best quality carnauba car wax with excellent results. This antique is now more like sculpture than an appliance, and she occupies a place of honor in my TN log home where she can be admired by guests. One friend was even inspired to find her own hand crank Singer after seeing mine. Of course I sent her links to all your videos, since there could be no better teacher. Thank you for making an inspiring set of tutorial videos. They made learning all about my vintage machine an adventure! Sincerely, Tracey H.

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    1. Hello Tracey,

      Thank you so much for your message. I am absolutely delighted that you have restored your machine to its former glory. If you are going to use it I hope the wax doesn't set up friction, preventing the material from gliding across the bed of the machine. I only ever tried putting polish on one of my machines and then found it was a nuisance. Of course you realise that your machine might just turn out to be the first of many...

      Happy New Year!

      Love,
      Muv

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  21. Hi can any one tell me why the tread is bunching on my little vesta?

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    Replies
    1. Tal, Have you threaded it correctly?

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  22. Dear Lizzie. Greetings from Melbourne, Australia. Thanks for your video about cleaning and oiling a machine. I have just managed to get a Wertheim 'Triumph' almost identical to a Singer 12K up and running and I am delighted with the result. The Japanning is a bit dull but I have decided to go carefully so as not to destry the decals. Can't wait to get started on my first project. Fran

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    1. Hello Franboy.
      Congratulations on your new machine! I love the old German machines - from what I gather there seems to be quite a few of them in Australia. I'm sure you will really enjoy using it.
      Love, Muv

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  23. Hi Muv! Can you tell it's winter downunder? I too have just acquired an old hand crank Hexagon which, from what I gather, is American and was taken over by Singer. My Hexagon is apparantly the precurser to the Singer 28 (I think).

    Anyway, I've just had your videos on all day as I've pulled it apart, cleaned it and oiled it. I have to say, the results are amazing. From having to put in a bit of effort to turn the crank my six year old is now whizzing it around with two fingers! Not bad for 100 odd years. So thank you very much - your efforts are much appreciated.

    Now, off to get some fat quarters and sew some patchwork table mats. Oh, and in recognition of the American machine, my son decided to call it Laura (after Ingalls Wilder).

    Thanks again

    x Juliet

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    Replies
    1. Hello Juliet,

      Absolutely delighted to hear that you have found my videos helpful and that you now have your machine running smoothly. You can be sure that it will give you many hours of pleasure.

      Here is a very brief history of the Hexagon machines..

      http://www.sewmuse.co.uk/standard.htm

      and here is another photo with a bit more information..

      http://www.sewmuse.co.uk/standard.htm

      The general idea is that the Singer 28 came first, Singer took over the Standard Sewing Machine Company and the Hexagon (no doubt based on the Singer 28) was morphed into the Singer 128, an updated version of the 28.

      Perhaps you might like to get your son to suggest a name for another machine - see my latest blog post today. You never know, you might win a prize!

      Love, Muv

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  24. Thanks for linking your first post Muv! I added myself as a GFC follower as I just came across some vintage machines myself and will be returning to do some "research". Val:)

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  25. Checking out your first post from Val's 1st post linky party. Makes me wish I had a vintage machine....

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  26. Sorry if I accidentally post twice! I don't think it worked first time around haha.

    I just wanted to say thanks so much for your videos! I'm completely new to sewing and I recently purchased my first sewing machine. I'm happy to say I'm the owner of a beautiful 1945 Singer 15k hand-crank machine in near pristine condition. As I said, I'm brand new to sewing and I've only used a machine once before and it was a fancy electric machine (I was terrible with the foot pedal haha).

    The good thing about me being completely new to sewing however is I have to start fresh when it comes to buying thread and the like. I plan on mainly using my machine to make cotton "soft books" for kids along with dresses for myself and my 3-year-old daughter. If I get good enough at sewing, I'd also love to make her a bunch of dress-up costumes for play time :) I'd only try to make the costumes after I'm comfortable working with cotton and the like first, as I'd love to use silk and tulle and the like for her costumes. I was just going to ask if you have any recommendations in terms of brands and types of thread to use and the like. I understand that it depends on the fabric you're using it with but I thought you may still have a suggestion for me possibly. Or, possibly any recommendations for items I should invest in to help hone a new skill. Thanks so much for your time. I'll have to take pictures of my new beauty to post on here and show yall! Thanks again!

    Kelsey

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    1. Hello Kelsey,

      Congratulations on your new machine. I always use 100% cotton thread.

      The most useful gadget ever is the seam guide. If you haven't got one already, check the Helen Howes Sewing Machines website - the link is at the bottom of the right hand sidebar on this page. Also check the posts on this blog under the heading Seam Guide.

      Have fun with your projects!

      Love, Muv
















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  27. Hi Muv,
    I've got (what I think is) a Singer 28k- can I do zigzag stitching on it? Do I need an attachment?
    I'm new to machine sewing, and your videos have helped no end! I'm very thankful!

    Lucy

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    Replies
    1. Hello Lucy,

      Congratulations on your new machine!

      The only way to do zigzagging on a straight stitch machine is with an attachment. It really isn't worth the fuss and bother. I've never used my zigzagger beyond trying it out. It is fine for decorative stitching, but for seam finishing there are plenty of methods which are ideal for straight stitch machines, such as felled seams and French seams - you will find instructions if you click the headings on the right hand side of this page.

      Love, Muv

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  28. Hi, Muv, thanks from Holland for sharing your knowledge . I am a classic car enthusiast, specializing on Peugeot. Obviously Peugeot has made (and is making) a lot of other stuff, part of which has ended up in my small collection. Several tube-type radio's from the 40'ies and 50'ies and sewing machines as well. Right now I have one that I think dates of 1911, and I managed to clean it and get it sewing again with help of your Youtube-movies. It's a long bobine model, very rarely seen in Holland.
    Thanks again, cheers!

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    1. Hello Anonymous,

      Absolutely delighted to hear from you!

      I have never seen a Peugeot sewing machine - they are probably rarer here than they are in Holland. I am so pleased that you have got it sewing. You will have to make something on it to breathe new life into it, much as you would take a classic car out for a drive. And while you are sewing, tune into some music on one of the old radios!

      Love, Muv

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  29. Hi Muv
    I only just found you. I'm a quilter, I have wanted a vintage singer for a few years now, I can remember my Mother having one when I was a child, then she got rid of it for a modern machine. I am wary of where to buy one, I live in north east England, could you point me in the right direction please, and maybe let me know of any models you recommend. I particularly like hand ones.

    Smiles, Kate

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    Replies
    1. Kate, So sorry for the late reply!

      You can play the waiting game until a decent machine comes up in your area on Ebay, otherwise scour second hand shops and charity shops. 99Ks are nice, as are 15Ks, but they are much heavier.

      Good luck!
      Love, Muv

      Delete
  30. I have just bought a Jones Medium CS treadle machine (no. 61248) which I have just been oiling and checking out generally. It seems to be in excellent condition overall but I have a problem in that I can't seem to disengage the action to use the bobbin winder without running the whole machine. There is a balance wheel catch which engages and disengages but the balance wheel movement is very tight when it's disengaged and it can only be forced round against the catch plate. My instruction book merely tells me to 'loosen the balance wheel' - I would if I could!
    Can you offer any advice please?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Sheila,
      Congratulations on your new machine!
      This is one of those irritating problems that can occur with old machines. I have the same problem with one of my treadles, I can't disengage the balance wheel, so I have given up trying to fix it and just make sure the needle isn't threaded when I am filling a bobbin.
      Love, Muv

      Delete
    2. Thank you. This confirms my suspicions! (Though I hate to be beaten by a machine!)

      Delete
  31. Lizzie

    Help! I have been watching your video on cleaning vintage singer sewing machines and successfully removed the stop motion screw to clean, polish and oil the mechanism BUT now cannot get it back on so that it engages with the balance wheel.
    In your video you show removing this and cleaning etc, but don't show how to get it back together. Please advise.

    Thanks
    Maureen


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Maureen,

      Here is the answer:-

      http://lizzielenard-vintagesewing.blogspot.co.uk/search/label/Stop%20Motion%20Screw

      Good luck!
      Love, Muv

      Delete
    2. Muv

      Thank you so much. This singer treadle 128 I am cleaning up is a gem.... and to think it only cost me $50.00 canadian, has all the original feet, instruction book etc.

      The posts you directed my to quickly showed that I had the washer in facing the wrong direction! Easy to do given the shape of this little item.

      To anyone with a similar problem... I still round it difficult to reinsert the stop motion screw because this washer will also slip as you try to screw the stop motion back in place.

      Solution
      I had my husband hold a long handled screw driver onto the edge of the washer ensuring it stayed put while I tighten in the stop motion and then the smaller screw.

      It is now engaged BUT only works with me pushing the balance wheel away from me, or clockwise.

      Does this matter???? Anyone know??

      Decided too to take the advise of another commenter and not even fiddle with "disengagement" for bobbin winding.
      Just leave presser foot up and machine unthreaded while doing the bobbins.

      All in all quite the learning experience and again thanks to those of you who have gone before.

      Cheers,
      Maureen

      Delete
    3. Hi

      Its Maureen again and yikes...... reading my manual and finding out that YES, this machine's balance wheel and treadle Must run counterclockwise.

      What could I possibly be doing wrong now, I wonder?

      Prior to starting all this, it ran ok in the counterclockwise motion.
      Starting to think I should have left well enough alone.

      Any ideas appreciated.

      Maureen

      Delete
    4. Maureen, I am not sure I understand your problem.. Does this video answer your question?

      http://lizzielenard-vintagesewing.blogspot.co.uk/2013/01/the-treadlers-eye-view.html

      Delete
    5. Muv

      I don't understand my problem either.

      I have viewed the "how to treadle video" and understand how it should work.
      I practised this prior to taking off my stop motion screw for cleaning.
      It worked exactly how Lizzie demonstrated.

      Now my machine will only start up the sewing action when I push the balance wheel in a clockwise direction and not at all in the "counterclockwise" direction that it is supposed to work in.

      So the big question is Why? and Im wondering how can I correct this.

      Thanks,
      Maureen

      Delete
    6. Sorry Maureen, I have no suggestions for you.

      Delete

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