Monday, 23 July 2012

Transverse Shuttles


All the machines I have shown so far have been Vibrating Shuttle machines, where the shuttle carriage is to the right of the needle and the shuttle moves back and forth in an arc.  Singer patented their design for Vibrating Shuttles in 1886.  Before then they had been manufacturing Transverse Shuttle machines.

These photographs are of a Frister and Rossmann Transverse Shuttle machine manufactured (probably) in the mid to late 1930s.  German manufacturers continued making Transverse Shuttle machines until the outbreak of the Second World War, when most manufacturers switched over to the production of arms.

The shuttle moves from side to side in a straight line behind the needle.  It fits snugly into its little bed, as shown in the second photo where I have slid back the plate.

The needle is threaded from front to back, whereas on a VS machine it is threaded from left to right.  Different, but the same principle - in both cases you take the thread through the needle towards the shuttle.

TS machines make an excellent stitch, equal to that of any VS machine, which no doubt explains why the Germans didn't stop making them until history so rudely intervened.

23 comments:

  1. Haven't seen these before ..have you ever heard of a Kerry sewing machine there was one in the charity shop but it was £100 out of my budget I'm afraid ...x

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hello Artymess,
    My guess is that it might be a Jones machine. If a company put in a large order for machines to sell on, Jones would put that company's name on the machine.
    A hundred quid is far too steep.
    Muv

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  3. I just bought a Kerry sewing machine on Sunday for $100 (much cheaper than £100, I'm afraid!) - it seems to work perfectly, I just need to figure out how to use the transverse shuttle!

    I can't find any other information on Kerry sewing machines on the internet - Artymess' comment was the only valuable lead I found on the internet so far!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Jenn,

      If you put a picture online - perhaps on your blog - I might have a better chance of helping you.

      Love,
      Muv

      Delete
  4. I am losing my mind. I have a Frister and Rossman transverse shuttle machine that has the feed dogs out of sync with the hook. True confession. I did some disassembly to clean it.

    The balance wheel has timing marks scratched on it, and when the marks line up, the hook is timed. But it tries to feed while the needle is down.

    Underneath it looks like a Singer 48K. I havee tried the obvious thing of releasing the shuttle drive at one end, rotating the wheel a partial turn, and reattaching it. Without allowing the shuttle to move. Perhaps I am just stupid, but this doesn't seem to make a difference.

    I don't see any other way to affect the sync. Is there anyone out there that knows these machines well enough to guess what has happened?

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  5. I have a Frister and Rossman transverse shuttle machine whose feed dogs have somehow gotten out of sync with the shuttle. The balance wheel has timing scratches, and when they line up, the shuttle is timed. I have some F&R original needles, and the machine has a needle stop. It forms a stitch as long as the feed dogs are disengaged.

    But it tries to feed while the needle is down.

    It would seem like you could fix this by releasing the shuttle drive link at one end, rotating the wheel a partial turn while holding the shuttle immobile. but I haven't been able to make this work. Is there some specific trick to this?

    The underside seems to be nearly identical to a Singer 48K.

    http://needlebar.org/nbwiki/images/4/46/48kunder.jpg

    Jim Sowder
    thanks for any help.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Jim,

      I'm sorry, I can't help you because I have never had to fix this problem.

      Perhaps if you got in touch with ISMACS they might point you in the right direction. Here is their list of useful books.
      http://www.ismacs.net/booklist/repair.html

      Good luck!

      Muv

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  6. Thanks. The most useful looking book is out of print and unavailable. Perhaps I could try interlibrary loan.

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  7. Success. I have spent many futile hours on this, but finally found the double secret timing marks on the upper drive gears. I'll post pictures on flickr with labels, so they'll show up on google searches. I'll post a link here.

    I have a ways to go. I need to make a tension release pin and figure out the bobbin winder.,But it stitches.

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  8. Here's my document. It got a bit out of hand, because there are so many confused people out there whe have trouble using these machines. I thought as long as I am taking pictures, I will document some things that aren't obvious to new owners.

    http://www.ersimages.com/ecards/Transverse%20Shuttle%20Use,%20Repair,%20Timing.pdf

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well done Jim!

      Thank you for the link. I have had a quick look, and now know where to go if I ever have the same trouble. Excellent photographs and plenty of detail - somebody somewhere will be thanking you.

      Muv

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  9. Hi, I've just found your blog (thank you) after buying a lovely Frisster Rossman "D" transverse shuttle machine, about 1930. Have your written about threading? I am a new to sewing machines and so am mystified!

    Kind regards and many thanks,

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Cordelia,

      Congratulations on your new machine!

      The top thread follows the same route as the Singer shown in the video in the following post, except for the fact that in a transverse shuttle the needle is threaded from front to back:-
      http://lizzielenard-vintagesewing.blogspot.co.uk/2012/06/threading-long-bobbin-sewing-machine.html

      The video also shows how to thread the shuttle. The illustrations in the following post will be helpful:-
      http://lizzielenard-vintagesewing.blogspot.co.uk/2012/12/the-vesta-
      manual.html

      As for the bobbin winder, it is likely to be either like this...
      http://lizzielenard-vintagesewing.blogspot.co.uk/2013/02/german-bobbin-winders-no-1.html

      ... or this...
      http://lizzielenard-vintagesewing.blogspot.co.uk/2013/03/german-bobbin-winders-no-2.html

      Please let me know how you get on.

      Love, Muv

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    2. Dear Muv,

      Thank you! I could not have gotten my "new" sewing machine sorted without your very kind assistance. I spent several days taking it apart to lean and oil, got it back together with only one tiny screw left over :) and have now not only wound the bobbing (nifty) but got it successfully threaded...all thanks to your fantastic advice and videos. Now onwards to learn to sew! Many many thanks,

      Delete
    3. Hello Cordelia,

      Truly excellent news! Having spent so many hours getting to know and love your machine, you will fully understand my unbounded enthusiasm for pre-war German bobbin winders, where small scale mechanical engineering reaches a truly sublime level of ingenuity.

      Learning to sew with your Frister and Rossmann will give you hours of pleasure. Good luck!

      Love, Muv



      Delete
  10. Hi Muv

    Starting to be fascinated by transverse shuttle machines but have yet to acquire one. What sort of needles does your 1930s F&R take?

    Hugs
    G

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    Replies
    1. Just a standard needle, same as all the Singers. Careful, Gavin, you might get hooked.

      Love, Muv

      Delete
  11. Hi Muv,

    I started collecting antique and vintage machines a few years ago and was recently given a Frister and Rossmann transverse shuttle machine that is in the most amazingly beautiful condition. I haven't sewn with it as yet (I'm a little intimidated to tell you the truth - it's just SO gorgeous) but would like to buy a second shuttle if the chance arises. Could you please advise what I should be looking for? Does it have to be a F and R branded shuttle?

    Kind regards,

    Anne

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Anne,

      Congratulations on your latest machine!

      I'm a bit puzzled - do you mean shuttle? You only need one. If you mean bobbin, it depends on which model of transverse shuttle you have. Either way, Helen Howes is the person you need to contact.

      http://helenhowes-sewingmachines.co.uk/shuttles.html

      Good luck!

      Love, Muv

      Delete
  12. Hello Muv - Just recently acquired a transverse shuttle hand crank machine that says HOWE on it. We are thinking it was made by a German manufacturer, perhaps F & R. Have not seen any other shuttles that look just like the one that was in it. Inside the shuttle (hard to read) looks like it is stamped with gart.stahl Have you run across this machine or shuttle before? I can send some pictures if you tell me where to send them. Thanks! -Mark-

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Mark.
      Howe machines were made either in the USA or Britain. It sounds as though it has come with a rogue German shuttle. If it works stick with it.
      Happy New Year,
      Muv

      Delete
  13. Hi ,
    After a lot of searching I was really pleased to find a link on how to thread the bobbin on my Frister and Rossmann Modern Cylinder D sewing machine...However it looks like the link is no longer there. Can anyone help please...thanks for your time. There is a utube video but it's an open shuttle.
    Thanks for your time.
    Anne

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anne, please check all the links in the answer I gave to Cordelia above. Do they answer your question? The only Frister and Rossmann Model D I know of is a transverse shuttle.
      Love, Muv

      Delete

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